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An Evening with Atheists

As we continue in our sermon series “God’s Answer to Atheism” at College Church, guest blogger Drew Dyck, managing editor of Leadership Journal,  shares with us his experience attending an atheist gathering in his neighborhood: Christians love talking about atheists. Generally, however, we’re less excited about talking to them. Well, one night last winter I set out to change that, at least in my own life. I attended an atheist gathering in my neighborhood. But first I had to go online and join their “meet-up” group. I remember my hand freezing on my computer mouse, unable to click the “join us” invitation. For a moment the cursor hovered over the button. Did I really want to do this? I had already interviewed dozens of atheists for the book project I was working on, but most of my interviews had been conducted over the phone or via email. Somehow the prospect of sitting face to face with them was more intimidating. I wasn’t afraid...

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9/11 Anniversary Lessons

Evangelicals Now published this month a recent article I wrote on the 10-year anniversary of 9/11: To even attempt to broach such a demanding topic in a few hundred words is to rush in where angels fear to tread. So first a preliminary word: this will not be exhaustive. It will not be ‘exhausting’ either, for which you may breathe a sigh of relief, because of its appropriate brevity. But the temptation in such a piece as this, on such a topic as that, is to attempt to provide ‘bullet points’ on all the major aspects that should be addressed (for instance, suffering, providence, war, religion, martyrdom, death, bravery, rescue missions, firefighters, security, to name but a few, and not to mention the massive secondary ‘literature’ about the event ranging from the popular urban legends to the more diatribe like, probably academic too). Instead, I will simply attempt the topic of “hermeneutics.” Yes, I know, hermeneutics is...

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Preaching Ecclesiastes in a Secular Age

A new series on Ecclesiastes begins this Sunday at College Church.  Ecclesiastes has a unique voice in the context of our secular age.  There have certainly been significant contributions made in recent years to the “God debate.” Some interesting conversations about that debate would be spurred by reference to Terry Eagleton’s Reason, Faith, and Revolution: Reflections on the God Debate (Yale University Press, 2009), a publication of Eagleton’s lectures at Yale for the 2008 “Dwight Harrington Terry Foundation Lectures on Religion in the Light of Science and Philosophy.”  Perhaps few, if any, readers would agree with everything that Eagleton says, but his telling, often funny, sometimes bromide-laden, always insightful, demolition job on Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens (or as he suggests calling them “Ditchkins”) is compelling.  Eagleton’s main point is that most new atheists have what he calls a “superstitious” view of God. Instead you might reference books by James W. Sire (Why Good Arguments Often...

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Seven Steps to the Perfect Start to College or University

This month many students are beginning their first year of college or university. Here are seven steps to the perfect start, not only for these new freshmen, but also for those students who have already begun and are seeking a fresh start. 1.  Read the Bible and pray. This sounds obvious, but it isn’t. With more social pressure, less time, and less privacy, maintaining a regular, daily, discipline of quiet times is going to be difficult.  Don’t let it slip. 2.  Be a member of a local Bible teaching church. The one consistent predictor of who stays a Christian and thrives spiritually after university or college is who is committed to a local Bible teaching church. I love para-church groups, have been involved with many, and support them, but if a student is not a part of a local church, they are far less likely to be part of a local church when they are no...

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Some Thoughts on Christian Weddings

Two Principles: Marriage is a creation gift from God (Genesis 2:18-25). That means that you don’t have to be a Christian to get the benefit of marriage. This is something that God – as an expression of his loving goodness – gives to all his creatures made in his image. It is a part of the natural created order, and like the sun and the rain it falls on the just and the not so just. But marriage is more than a creation gift; it is a message about Christ’s love for the church (Ephesians 5:31-32). Within the created order, God in His providence invested a type, a foreshadow, a sign to point to Christ and his love for the church.  Many times in the Old Testament, and in the New, the relationship between God and his people is compared to a marriage relationship. This is not just a cutesy metaphor.  Marriage, in a very real sense,...

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Vacation

With summer officially upon us, here are some ways to make the most of your vacation/holiday: 1. Rest For the inveterate workaholics the idea of any sort of break can seem faintly guilt inducing. Remember that rest is God’s idea, a creation ordinance, affirmed in the Ten Commandments, and a part of expressing the gospel by resting in God’s sovereignty. So rest. That doesn’t necessarily mean getting up really late (if you have young children that’s never going to happen anyway), but it might mean going to bed early. And perhaps an afternoon nap. 2. Relax Relaxation is not the same as resting. Relaxation might well involve some pretty vigorous exercise. Or it might involve consciously giving yourself to think through some things in your life in quiet. It might mean ‘getting away from it all’ mentally as well as geographically enough so that you do not have the needs of the office, or the home, constantly consciously...

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God-Centered Living

Here’s the why and how of God-centered living. Why? We are made by God. We are not our own. Whether we live abundantly wicked lives, or good old fashioned clean living lives, a life that is not surrendered to God is not life as the Bible defines it. We are the walking dead even if we physically live if our life is not God-centered (Ephesians 2:1). Take the illustration of someone renting a room in someone else’s house. They may keep their room clean. They may not trash it or play loud music at 3 in the morning.  But if they do not pay rent, they are, however nicely, living in a room that is not giving what they owe to the owner of the house. Similarly, if we live nice comfortable lives but don’t give our due to God, then we are not living life as designed by the Creator. Jesus...

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Moody and magnificent!

(Warning: flagrant self-promotion to follow.) My book No Other Gospel (Crossway, 2011) has just been published and I have duly been doing the rounds of radio interviews on Christian radio in the US. They have certainly been fascinating. Whereas in the UK there is Premier Radio listened to by a loyal audience, no doubt, in the US there is a very large population of Christians who listen to Christian talk radio, with news and music, and regular preaching programming. Some of it perhaps classifies as ‘naff’ or ‘cheesy’, but much of it is genuinely edifying and helpful. There is also the very fast-paced twitter and blogging world. Recently a controversial new book, with a pre-release video, was posted by a well known American blogger and over the weekend received something like a quarter of a million hits. That kind of attention, and internet traffic, was enough to get CNN interested. We are talking —...

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No Weddings and a Funeral

Some remarkable new studies have emerged about the changing patterns of marriage in America. For decades, it has been assumed that the more educated elites tended towards being more liberal in this and many other ways, while the lower echelons, the less educated with minimal if any college education, are assumed to be more conservative with relation to marriage and anything else. A strange complexity For a long time it has been known that this picture has a strange complexity to it: the more educated, while liberal in theory about marriage, actually tend to be pretty conservative about it in their own practice. What’s new, though, is that there is a growing body of evidence that the less educated, whatever their ideological theory, are in practice moving decisively away from long-term marriage commitments. There is more divorce, more out of wedlock birth, less commitment to the institution of marriage. This is a seismic change...

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